Banana Farm

expat life Pretoria Africa travel Kruger National Park scenic drives

Bananas are abundant and cheap in South Africa.  It’s common to find a bunch of organic bananas in Woolworth’s (“Wooly’s”) for about the equivalent of two US dollars.

expat life Pretoria Africa travel Kruger National Park scenic drives

Field of bananas

And believe me, I take advantage. I have bananas in my steel cut oats, plain banana at breakfast, bananas in my smoothie, and while driving around Kruger National Park, Kurt and I had several peanut butter and banana sandwiches (yes, seriously. Try it.)

expat life Pretoria Africa travel Kruger National Park scenic drives

White bags generally indicate organic bananas.

expat life Pretoria Africa travel Kruger National Park scenic drives

The fields of bananas stretched as far as we could see on both sides of the road.

Just before the town of Hazyview, we drove past a massive field of banana trees. And on our return, from the other side of the road we saw the distribution center and a nice little banana stand.

expat life Pretoria Africa travel Kruger National Park scenic drives

Look closely on the left and you will notice blue bags on these trees. This would normally indicate chemically treated, conventional bananas. I always wonder just how organic any food can be if grown alongside chemically treated food. It doesn’t stop me from purchasing or eating, but just something to chew on.

expat life Pretoria Africa travel Kruger National Park scenic drives

I love the giant banana, but notice, if you can, the little Hippo Crossing sign just beyond it.

I was curious on those plastic bags covering the actual bananas, and when I did my search, came across an interesting article about the environmental impact of those bags, because apparently whether the conventionally chemically treated bananas (in blue bags) or the organically treated ones (in white bags) the disposal of the bags themselves isn’t regulated. His article is aimed at the Dominican Republic, not South Africa, but it does beg the question on whether being “organic” shouldn’t also be more environmentally conscientious?

expat life Pretoria Africa travel Kruger National Park scenic drives

An Umbhaba truck ready to deliver banana goodness.

expat life Pretoria Africa travel Kruger National Park scenic drives

Laborers working on the organic banana trees.

Well, that’s enough meandering for now. Off to photography class this morning but wanted to leave you to enjoy this little (banana) slice of life here in South Africa.

Love, Marla

2 Comments on “Banana Farm

  1. Can’t be a Pennsylvania thing, that Banana and Peanut Butter combo I love it also and I am third generation Texan. I however, mix honey with mine.

    I was wondering about the organic versus treated banana’s. Interesting question especially as they are grown side-by-side.

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